Will Alaska seafood give your running the edge?

As any seasoned runner knows, there is no substitute for hard graft and the training miles you put in will pay dividends for your overall fitness. But just how important is nutrition when it comes to running, and will seafood give your fitness the edge?

Will Alaska seafood give your running the edge?

Research shows that incorporating seafood in your diet can have a dramatic impact on your health, which in turn will benefit your running fitness.

Seafood from Alaska is prized as some of the highest quality seafood in the world, so sourcing your fish from the right place will power up your running! Here's how fruits of the sea can give your running the edge:

Strong bones 

Alaska seafood has no artificial colouring, preservatives, pesticides or GMOs. The nutrients that are packed within Alaska seafood can heal and boost muscle growth, build strong bones and improve alertness, all essential factors for high impact exercising such as running. 

Vitamin kick

Alaska seafood is naturally high in essential vitamins including E, C, D, A. It's also rich with minerals zinc, iron, calcium and selenium. Calcium and vitamin D are best known for building strong bones and preventing stress fractures, which is imperative for an activity like running.

Heart health

Fish from Alaska swim wild. This freedom to swim means the fish swim long journeys so have higher levels of omega-3 fatty acids and lower levels of fat than many other fish. Omega-3 fatty acids are essential to help lower blood pressure and regulate heart rate.

Recover faster 

Zinc helps heal wounds and grow new cells, making it perfect for muscle recovery and injury healing that can occur when running. Some studies suggest that runners in general may be more susceptible to iron deficiency. The main symptoms of an iron deficiency in a runner are fatigue and poor or reduced performance.

Protein power

Alaska seafood is also an excellent natural source of protein. Protein accelerates muscle growth and speeds recovery by helping rebuild muscle fibres that become stressed during a run. Since protein helps muscles heal faster, runners who consume the right amount are less likely to get injured. 

Alaska seafood

While all fruits of the sea come with multiple health benefits, Alaska seafood hails from the pristine waters of Alaska so it’s a firmer, fitter and a more vibrant fish.

Fish from Alaska swim wild. This freedom to swim means the fish have higher levels of omega-3 fatty acids and lower levels of fat than many other fish. Wild Alaska seafood has no artificial colouring, preservatives, pesticides and GMOs and so retains all the goodness from when it is frozen to when it ends up on the dinner plate.

Heaps of health benefits

Here at The Running Bug we were keen to put Alaska seafood’s to the test, so we’ve employed the help of seven runners to see just how far a diet rich in Alaskan seafood will take their running and overall health.

The Medicinal Chef and Alaska Seafood UK ambassador, Dale Pinnock, has long been an advocate of tucking into delicious, fresh seafood. He eats a fish-rich diet regularly for the health reasons it boasts and suggests that we do the same. 'One of the most important components of Human Nutrition are the omega 3 fatty acids. They're vital for the health of the nervous system, cognitive function and cell receptor function. My recommendation is to eat high quality sea food 3-4 times per week to get regular supplies of vital fats.' 

So,  what are you waiting for! Boost your running and help your heart, brain and bone health by stocking up on fresh fish every week. Alaska seafood is now available in all supermarkets across UK in cans, frozen, chilled or smoked. To try it for yourself visit alaskaforeverwild.com

For delicious seafood recipe inspiration, head over to alaskaforeverwild.com/recipes

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